Get EcoBricking!

Ever wondered what to do with those pesky bits of unrecyclable plastic so they don’t end up in landfill? EcoBrick them!

EcoBricks

Ian Dommisse of EcoBrick Exchange gave me the scoop on what exactly EcoBricks are and how to make them. Here’s the lowdown:

What are EcoBricks?
Essentially, it’s a technology to replace traditional building bricks. EcoBricks are 2 liter plastic bottles stuffed with unrecyclable plastic. The concept was born in Guatemala after a major flood created an urgent need to rebuild houses. The bricks are not load bearing, so they need to sit as a fill within a concrete or steel structure, making them particularly well-suited for insulation purposes or for use in multi-storey structures.

Bright and cheerful, the bricks are used to make raised garden beds, benches, furniture and other structures such as play centres. A recent project includes the building of a Learn and Play Centre in Port Elizabeth – a collaborative (and super inspiring!) project which you can read about here.

How are they made?
Once you have a stash of unrecyclable plastic — sweet wrappers, plastic bags, food packaging, foil, photos, cling wrap, polystyrene, toothpaste and cosmetic tubes, plastic straws, elastics, and small plastic toys (Stikeez!) — you’re good to go:

  • Clean the plastic and begin compressing it into a 2 liter coke (or other) bottle
  • Use a stick to pack each layer as tightly as you can; it needs to be firm. You shouldn’t be able to squish it with one hand, or more than around one tenth of its weight
  • It’s best to use bottles of the same size and to keep them out the sun
  • Once your brick/s are done, you can take them to one of the drop-off points around the country. Keep an eye on the EcoBrick Exchange website for a growing list, but for now, here’s where you can drop-off:

Cape Town
– Montebello Design Centre (Newlands)
– Gugu S’thebe (Langa)
– Health Connection (Fish Hoek)
– The Daily Grinder (Simon’s Town)
– Foragers (Scarborough)
Port Elizabeth
– The Re-trade Project (Walmer)
Johannesburg
– Wecreate (Maboneng)
Pretoria
– Mamelodi West Community Hall

Building communities
EcoBricking is a novel way to reduce litter and divert waste from our toxic, heaving landfills, which are fast running out of airspace. But it doesn’t just have environmental benefits. EcoBrick Exchange, the NGO spearheading the technology, run various projects for government, schools, NGO’s and corporates, and most programmes have a job creation component built in. The response from across South Africa has been amazing; communities have been mobilised to get EcoBricking — protecting the environment and learning new skills in the process.

It’s an informal, untested technology so there’s been some red tape in getting projects off the ground – but its gaining momentum and EcoBrick Exchange are continually experimenting with new technologies (such as wobble blocks) and refining their various programmes.

Learn more and get involved!
To see some of the beautiful creations yourself you can visit the Guga S’thebe Arts and Cultural Centre in Langa, the site of many workshops and a storage facility for the bricks.

To hear about upcoming workshops and events, keep an eye on the EcoBrick Facebook page here.

And if you’d like to get your school involved or open up a drop off point please email the EcoBrick team at info@ecobrickexchange.org with your idea in the subject line.

EcoBrick Tower
A tower of EcoBricks!
How to make an EcoBrick ppt
Handy EcoBricking graphic

 

 

A passionate permaculturalist

Arriving at Saskia’s house in the suburbs, there’s nothing to prepare you for the abundant food forest contained within its walls. Over a period of 5 or so years, Saskia has toiled, tirelessly, to transform her conventional suburban garden into a thriving model of permaculture.

Her passion is contagious. Below is just some of what Saskia had to say about her journey. I’ll be sharing more of her wisdom and insights in further instalments of this post. But for now….

What motivated you to start growing your own food?
“I’ve always had a passion for growing edibles and for gardening. This stems, I suspect, from many hours spent watching my mothers’ veggie gardens thrive; the taste and smell of just-pulled carrots still hanging onto some good earth; freshly plucked strawberries and sweet sweet figs; oooh and those apricots!

I also have memories of myself in my toddler years, pre-teens and teens on my grandparents small holding in Pretoria, conversing with the chickens, sheep, peacock and tadpoles and observing the fascinating processes of my grandfather’s honey collecting, biltong-making; and planting and harvesting of maize and other earthly goodnesses.

It was however, not until Kent Tahir Cooper walked into my yoga classes some 7 years ago, that my passion for permaculture was truly ignited and fuelled. I ‘interned’ myself under the watchful and mindful guidance of Tahir, by intensely converting our run-of-the-mill urban garden into a zone of permaculture abundance.

It took many hours of sweat, perseverance, many challenges, and extremely late nights watching movie upon movie: from Bill Mollison to Geoff Lawton and everything in between. I stopped at nothing – to my family’s frustration. I measured and walked and observed every corner of the property and implemented the permaculture principles without holding back.”

Some of the benefits?
“The compounding benefits I observed whilst working with nature thrilled me, not only in respect of my own personal health, but also in the health of this patch of urban space. The more intensely I worked and connected with the earth, following the permaculture principles and techniques, the more I observed positive shifts and the unquestionable regeneration of this ecosystem within ecosystems that I call our home. My family then followed as they began to experience the shifts too, and to taste the fruits of our labour – literally.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Saskia’s apricot tree with the fruit covered in kaolin clay to keep the fruit flies at bay. It was a bumper crop and she made jam with the excess. She says “I used very little sugar, enjoyed the process, and the jam turned out to be surprisingly super-tangy delicious. So I put it down to beginner’s luck and yet another great philosophy learnt for life: a little bit of this, a little bit of that (‘diversity’ in permaculture lingo), enjoy the process – and voila!”

We also began to notice the cost-saving in terms of veggies and fruits and herbs; and the petrol saved from driving to the shops and back; and the health benefits of eating home-grown fresh produce. Our friends and family noticed too and started asking for help to implement the same at their homes; then came our children’s friends asking questions, and so the children’s workshops came into being; and then came the demand for planter boxes to house the veggies, so we started to make those. The garden and system continued to develop until we had surplus knowledge and plants and produce to share, and now we love to share!

The journey continues to unfold as every day brings new challenges, new ideas, new solutions waiting to be revealed.”

Top tips for someone wanting to start a veggie garden?

  • Observe, observe and observe your site.
  • Involve all of the stakeholders right from the beginning whether you are working with your own home, an NGO, a corporate or private individuals. Obtain EVERYONE’S input, ideas and vision.
  • If you possibly can, attend a good internationally accredited PDC (Permaculture Design Course) that has a reputable reputation and is facilitated by experienced permaculture practitioners; or obtain advice and guidance from an experienced trained permaculture practitioner.
  • Design a sound viable Mainframe Plan. Without this, you set yourself up for possible disappointment down the line.
  • Plant what you eat, and not what you don’t.
  • Have fun and enjoy the journey!

Your favourite things to grow? And things you’d love to grow in the future?
Too many to name but here are a few: tamarillos (tree tomatoes); Italian tree tomatoes (actually tomatoes – huge ones); asparagus; bananas; granadillas; tulsi; ashwaganda (the bull-bulls love them!); watercress; pear-melons; grapes; zucchini; beans; peas; figs; brussels sprouts; sweet potatoes (edible, pretty, groundcovers – why on earth would anyone BUY them. They LOVE growing in sandy soil and are so abundant!); lemons; apricots; celery; kale; chard.

I’d love to grow a large abundant sage bush – for some reason sage just doesn’t grow well in our soil. I’d love to grow kiwi fruit, and coffee, and litchis and coconuts, but our micro-climate is not quite ready for those additions as yet. And we LOVE to collect our own eggs! We also LOVE to grow our heirloom veggie and herb seedlings; indigenous plants and pioneer plants for ourselves, our friends and family and the greater community.

banana circle in chicken area
Banana circle in chicken area

*Stay tuned for more from Saskia. And to read more about Urban Farmstead’s workshops, check out their site here.