Coffee With: Renata Harper

It’s time for our next Q&A! Just love these soulful, beautifully crafted words from Renata Harper, editor of EnviroKids.

Renata Harper
Why do you do what you do?
The natural world is my muse. Writing is one of many ways that I can express my love for nature and celebrate her keepers and creatures. I took the position of editor at EnviroKids (WESSA’s quarterly magazine for young eco-champions), because it’s a powerful way to share the magic of our planet with young South Africans. As a reluctant “grown-up”, it also allows me to be childlike, to play and enthuse.

Even if wordcraft weren’t my chosen profession, I would continue to write for myself. I’ve written through confusion, anxiety and heartache and it always brings me to the other side. I guess I write mostly to make sense of myself and of the world.

If you weren’t a writer, what would you be? 
I would love to have been born in a musical! More feasibly, I would work in wildlife rehabilitation (and write about it) or be a conservation documentary-maker. I don’t discount either as future possibilities!

The 3 books that have had the biggest impact on you?
Sapiens, by Yuval Noah Harari – it reminds us to look much further back and much further forward than we tend to.

The Artist’s Way, by Julia Cameron – I experience it differently each time I work through it. More recently, it’s given me the courage to slowly opt out of routines and roles that don’t reflect who I am. Scary, but it couldn’t have come at a better time!

The Magic Faraway Tree series, by Enid Blyton – because I always knew trees held other magical worlds.

A quote you love?
“You may say I’m a dreamer / But I’m not the only one…”

I also love this comment by Barbara Kingsolver, in Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: One Year of Seasonal Eating: “People often ask me whether I feel I’m missing out on city life. I look around, at the mountains, at the setting sun, and I wonder who is missing out.”

Your perfect getaway – forest treehouse or beach shack?
Forest treehouse. I love the coolness and wisdom of trees, the diversity of life they support, the dancing of the light. (But an unfenced rustic bushveld camp would win, hands down, every time.)

Your favourite way to recharge?
SARK, one of my favourite creativity authors, writes: “When a child gets crabby, put them in water.” My version would be: take me up a mountain. Movement, exploration and adventure energise me as much as rest does. And I love a good movie! I often go alone, and at unexpected times, just to escape and delight myself.

Top of your bucket list?
Costa Rica – I’m fascinated by its biodiversity, as well as the environmental ethos embedded in its governance. Then Botswana… I’m just waiting to win a 4×4.

Advice you’d give your 16-year-old self?
Reach out when you need help. Support – financial, spiritual, practical – is everywhere and comes in the most surprising ways, if you just ask for it. And take tango lessons – if you don’t, you’ll regret it when you’re 37. Conversely, she’d remind me not to let others, even (especially!) those who are well meaning, to deflate me.

Your favourite ‘wild’ place in the city?
A time rather than a place: dawn, because it’s precious no matter where you are. In my urban life, I am alert to wild moments all the time, like the African harrier-hawk that raided the Cape sparrows’ nest in our garden and the squirrel that planted its own crops (peanuts, of course!) in our veggie patch. Without these kinds of wild reminders, I’d feel “ecologically bored”, as George Monbiot describes it in Feral.

Humanity in a hundred years – where do you think we’ll be?
If we can listen to nature’s calls and our own deepest, most authentic longings… if we can rewrite our story to be more compassionate towards the planet… I can see us thriving alongside nature. There are enough of us who care.

Your source of strength when the going gets tough?
A belief in a bigger picture, and knowing that I don’t always see it in the moment. And the kindred spirits in my life, both human and animal.

For you, winning at life is ……….
… when I experience time as expansive. I’m very aware of death and time is the most precious resource to me. I’m happy when I lose track of it, when I can follow my curiosity, play within a creative process. I hate having to rush though my day or a project, or to focus solely on an end-product. I start to feel down when my time feels squeezed. This has made working in a deadline-driven environment very difficult for me at times.

What you’d still love to accomplish in this life?
I’d love to experience a natural area intimately, to understand its needs, to witness its challenges and victories, to know its stalwarts and upstarts. Professionally I’d like to write a book on creativity as a way of living, as well as a humorous animation with a strong conservation message (I’ve written one brief scene!). And I’d like to finally start a blog.

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