Coffee With: Hayley McLellan

I’m super excited about ‘Coffee With’, a new series of Q&A’s with local eco-warriors committed to making the world just a little greener and wilder.

Plastic Free July is a few days away, so it seems fitting that our first Q&A is with Hayley McLellan, environmental campaigner and founder of Rethink the Bag. Here’s a little about the woman on a mission to get the plastic bag banned in South Africa.

Hayley Mclellan

Why do you do what you do?
Over my years of being involved with animal care and behaviour, the creatures inspired me to seek to know more about our natural world. In knowing more I found that I naturally cared so much more. By caring in this deeper manner, I found myself moved to take personal actions for a healthier environment.

Being a custodian of our earth can feel so overwhelming in our everyday life full of its challenges, and defend it is exactly what each of us should be doing. It motivates me to communicate simple ways ordinary people can feel empowered to make small changes in their daily living yet still affect big change.

If you weren’t an environmental campaigner, what would you be?
I strongly feel I would be involved in the world of dance as I had enjoyed this my entire youth. When I began my (accidental) environmental career, in the late 80’s, I turned down an opportunity to audition for a dance company. It was a real moment of “sliding doors” for me in which I found myself enamoured with the offer of becoming a dolphin trainer, and chose to walk through that door. The rest is history. I still attend many dance shows and dream about what could have been though.

The 3 books that have had the biggest impact on you? 
There have been so many, but these spring to mind:
The Natural Way
by Mark and Mary-Ann Shearer
Blessed Unrest  Paul Hawken
Long Walk to Freedom by Nelson Mandela

A quote you love?
‘Life is tough, suffering is optional’

Your perfect getaway – forest treehouse or beach shack?
Tough! Forest treehouse.

Your favourite way to recharge?
An after work stroll along the Sea Point promenade, easily accessible every day!

Top of your bucket list?
Travel to Alaska.

Advice you’d give your 16 year old self?
30 year olds are not old and one day, anytime in your 40’s, you will still feel 30ish!

Your favourite ‘wild’ place in the city?
Hiking a mountain trail or Kirstenbosch Gardens.

Humanity in a hundred years — where do you think we’ll be?
After reading Paul Hawken’s Blessed Unrest many years ago, I felt uplifted in that there are so many incredible and effective environmental and humanitarian movements taking place globally. In all of the everyday bad news and turmoil, I find this author’s insights very encouraging, especially related to the work that I engage with daily.

Ecoanxiety officially exists and one of the ways I deal with this occasional malady is to keep sight of what’s going right with the world. I believe that tipping points will continue to occur that will create a humanity that focuses on value-centric living which equates to more win, win, win in terms of people, planet, profit.

Your source of strength when the going gets tough?
Home to our family farm in northern KZN. There is truly nowhere else that feeds my soul the way being there does.

For you, winning at life is ……….
Experiencing and witnessing harmonious relationships between people and nature; A South Africa that acknowledges equal opportunities for all, poverty alleviation and a booming economy.

What you’d still love to accomplish in this life?
No brainer! A plastic shopping bag free South Africa!

*You can read about Hayley’s work at the Two Oceans Aquarium and the Rethink the Bag Campaign here.

Get EcoBricking!

Ever wondered what to do with those pesky bits of unrecyclable plastic so they don’t end up in landfill? EcoBrick them!

EcoBricks

Ian Dommisse of EcoBrick Exchange gave me the scoop on what exactly EcoBricks are and how to make them. Here’s the lowdown:

What are EcoBricks?
Essentially, it’s a technology to replace traditional building bricks. EcoBricks are 2 liter plastic bottles stuffed with unrecyclable plastic. The concept was born in Guatemala after a major flood created an urgent need to rebuild houses. The bricks are not load bearing, so they need to sit as a fill within a concrete or steel structure, making them particularly well-suited for insulation purposes or for use in multi-storey structures.

Bright and cheerful, the bricks are used to make raised garden beds, benches, furniture and other structures such as play centres. A recent project includes the building of a Learn and Play Centre in Port Elizabeth – a collaborative (and super inspiring!) project which you can read about here.

How are they made?
Once you have a stash of unrecyclable plastic — sweet wrappers, plastic bags, food packaging, foil, photos, cling wrap, polystyrene, toothpaste and cosmetic tubes, plastic straws, elastics, and small plastic toys (Stikeez!) — you’re good to go:

  • Clean the plastic and begin compressing it into a 2 liter coke (or other) bottle
  • Use a stick to pack each layer as tightly as you can; it needs to be firm. You shouldn’t be able to squish it with one hand, or more than around one tenth of its weight
  • It’s best to use bottles of the same size and to keep them out the sun
  • Once your brick/s are done, you can take them to one of the drop-off points around the country. Keep an eye on the EcoBrick Exchange website for a growing list, but for now, here’s where you can drop-off:

Cape Town
– Montebello Design Centre (Newlands)
– Gugu S’thebe (Langa)
– Health Connection (Fish Hoek)
– The Daily Grinder (Simon’s Town)
– Foragers (Scarborough)
Port Elizabeth
– The Re-trade Project (Walmer)
Johannesburg
– Wecreate (Maboneng)
Pretoria
– Mamelodi West Community Hall

Building communities
EcoBricking is a novel way to reduce litter and divert waste from our toxic, heaving landfills, which are fast running out of airspace. But it doesn’t just have environmental benefits. EcoBrick Exchange, the NGO spearheading the technology, run various projects for government, schools, NGO’s and corporates, and most programmes have a job creation component built in. The response from across South Africa has been amazing; communities have been mobilised to get EcoBricking — protecting the environment and learning new skills in the process.

It’s an informal, untested technology so there’s been some red tape in getting projects off the ground – but its gaining momentum and EcoBrick Exchange are continually experimenting with new technologies (such as wobble blocks) and refining their various programmes.

Learn more and get involved!
To see some of the beautiful creations yourself you can visit the Guga S’thebe Arts and Cultural Centre in Langa, the site of many workshops and a storage facility for the bricks.

To hear about upcoming workshops and events, keep an eye on the EcoBrick Facebook page here.

And if you’d like to get your school involved or open up a drop off point please email the EcoBrick team at info@ecobrickexchange.org with your idea in the subject line.

EcoBrick Tower
A tower of EcoBricks!
How to make an EcoBrick ppt
Handy EcoBricking graphic

 

 

That old chestnut

It’s a conversation my farm boy and I have a lot. It came up in our cramped Beijing and Hong Kong quarters; again in our quaint London terrace, and now more than ever it seems, when we’re lucky enough to sneak away for a country getaway.

A night away at Old Mac Daddy in Elgin is enough to send anyone’s hankering-for-a-patch-of-land into overdrive. Country life as the antidote to the stresses and strains wrought by the city? A quixotic idea perhaps, but one I see lingering.

It was bitingly cold, the air was pristine and the light golden. One night in our funky airstream trailer felt like a week it was so restorative; still, it wasn’t enough and we’ll definitely be back, for longer next time.

5 reasons to stick to seasonal

bowl of orangesWhen we lived in Hong Kong I found the expat supermarkets mind boggling. Talk about being spoilt for choice. Not much grows in this high-density concrete jungle yet browse the aisles of their supermarkets and there’s very little you can’t find. In season, out of season, every delicacy from every corner of the globe.

As wonderful as it is to live in the southern hemisphere and eat berries in winter, it’s far from a carbon neutral experience. Many miles are covered and many fossil fuels burnt to get those berries to you – plus untold amounts of pesticides sprayed to ensure they arrive looking pert and fresh.

Eating what’s in season, I’m learning more and more, has few (if any) downsides and scores of upsides. Here, in a nutshell, are just some of them:

  • Grown in the right conditions, seasonal food can be picked when ripe and is therefore fresher, juicier and a whole lot more flavourful
  • The journey from soil to plate is short and low on air miles
  • You’ll be supporting the local economy by buying from local farmers, growers and artisanal food producers
  • Variety. And getting back in tune with our natural cycles and rhythms. We were designed to eat certain foods at certain times of year. For example, watermelon and juicy fruit to hydrate in the hot summer months and leafy greens to strengthen our immunity before the winter months.
  • Supplies are high so it’s cheaper!

Still not convinced? Read Barbara Kingsolver’s Animal, Vegetable, Mineral for inspiration and great seasonal cooking tips.

And check back here soon for my Cape Town seasonal eating chart.