Much more mulch

My parents taught me many things. Gardening and a love for the outdoors wasn’t one of them. Our gardens were unloved extensions of our houses; we were seldom in them. A love for all things green is something that has, over time, trickled into my consciousness.

Over the years, in between all the moving, I’ve dabbled with growing things. Mostly with succulents and herbs, and usually in pots. But the urge to stick stuff in the ground, watch it grow, yank it out and eat it, is growing stronger.

As I muddle along and experiment, I’m constantly learning and adapting what happens in our tiny patch of suburban land. I have a gardener who helps me a few hours a week and every week for the past few years, he’d diligently stand in the beds and poke holes in the soil, to aerate it and prevent it from becoming compacted. Next he’d rake up all the leaves, bag them up and toss them in the trash – creating a neat, manicured garden where everything was trimmed back and contained.

We’ve wisened up since then and learnt a thing or two – about mulch and about microlife in the soil.

Mulch, the layer of organic material on top of your soil, does wonders for your garden:

  • it regulates the temperature, keeping heat out and moisture in – crucial if you’re gardening in a water scarce place
  • mulching with nutrient-rich compost or leaf mould allows microlife to thrive in the soil. Soil teeming with microlife is naturally aerated (from worms wriggling and burrowing) and unlikely to become compacted. Poking holes in the soil only upsets the delicate balance of the tiny creatures working their magic in the layers of your soil
  • a mulch keeps weeds from popping up
mulch
A mulch of fallen leaves and bark. Time will tell whether the bark is too acidic for that patch of soil.

We don’t turf our fallen leaves anymore, we treasure them. We let them pile up in our beds or we chuck them in our just-acquired leaf mulcher, in the hope of making leaf mould.

leaf-mould
The start of our leaf mould experiment – no doubt one that will be replete with lessons. I’m letting it pile up and will turn and moisten occasionally. I’ve heard coffee grounds help kickstart decomposition so will try that too and see what happens.

The ‘no dig, chop and drop’ approach to gardening is resonating more and more. Less primping and pruning and trying to bend the garden to our will. Our focus is shifting –  we’ll aim to get the basics right – enrich the soil, plan the best position for plants, strengthen them, and then, as much as possible, let nature take over and do what its perfectly designed to do.

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